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Donor Spotlights
Donor spotlight – Marc Diamant

As a monthly donor and volunteer with Weizmann Canada’s Toronto chapter, Marc Diamant reflects on his instant connection to the Weizmann Institute and his passion for protecting the environment for future generations.

‘L’dor v’dor,’ is an ancient Hebrew concept that means ‘from generation to generation.’ For Marc Diamant, he equates the idea to the principles of basic science research. “It means investing in sustainability to preserve the future of all species and for our planet, so that future generations can continue to develop, thrive, and evolve,” he explains.  

Marc first experienced the wonders of the Weizmann Institute of Science in April 2021 when he attended Final Frontiers – Exploring the Universe and the Human Brain, a first-of-its-kind Pan-American event hosted online by Weizmann Canada, Weizmann’s American committee (ACWIS) and the South American Weizmann committees. He heard from Prof. Ofer Yizhar and Dr. Moran Shalev-Benami about Weizmann’s pioneering brain research and from Prof. Oded Aharonson and Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield about the remarkable advancements and potential for our exploration of the universe.  

The whole event left an undeniable impression on him. ‘I felt it in my bones that I must contribute in any way possible to the mission of the Weizmann Institute,” Marc remembers. Within a few days, he connected with Susan Stern, Weizmann Canada’s CEO on LinkedIn. Soon they had a meeting setup which included National Board Member Francie Klein, who also leads the Toronto volunteer chapter, to learn about getting involved.

“I felt it in my bones that I must contribute in any way possible to the mission of the Weizmann Institute.”
— Marc Diamant

Since becoming a volunteer and attending events with scientists from a range of fields, Marc has been especially drawn to the unique culture of collaboration and curiosity that the Institute’s researchers pride themselves in. “I find it absolutely fascinating the academic freedom that they pursue by fostering collaboration among elite scientists from a diversity of backgrounds and scientific research fields,” he says. The Weizmann Institute is definitely one of the best basic research and higher education institutions in the world, where the future is built today.” 

L to R: Toronto Chapter members, Francie Klein, Marc Diamant, John Rose, Susan Rose, Amalia Berg, Michelle Glied-Goldstein at Mission Imperative in September 2022.

Leaving a planet for future generations 

Thinking about the role that science plays in our lives, he reflects that there’s never been more of a time when science has been so central in almost everything we do. “Science is one of the highest expressions of organized and applied thought we have as human beings,” says Marc. “Its use in a positive way for the good of humankind has and will continue to enhance, extend, and improve our quality of life.” 

In a recent conversation, Marc’s son asked him if he thinks he will be able to have grandchildren one day who can live healthily on this planet. Even looking two generations ahead, Marc admits that it is a difficult question to think about.  

“I’d suggest to anyone wanting to leave a legacy for future generations to consider getting involved with Weizmann as I did.”
— Marc Diamant

In a recent conversation, Marc’s son asked him if he thinks he will be able to have grandchildren one day who can live healthily on this planet. Even looking two generations ahead, Marc admits that it is a difficult question to think about.  

For now, he is focused on what he can do and is motivated by the Weizmann scientists he has heard from, who are leading meaningful advancements in environmental research. His goal is to do something for Weizmann every day, whether that’s having conversations about the Institute with those in his own network or personally sending them the latest environmental advancement from the Institute. Each action has been his own source of hope. 

“If we want to leave a legacy, then we better leave a planet. Because without a planet, there is no legacy,” he says. “I’d suggest to anyone wanting to leave a legacy for future generations to consider getting involved with Weizmann as I did.” 

L to R: Melroy Coelho, Francie Klein, Stuart Klein, Marc Diamant at Weizmann Canada’s Hanukkah celebration in Toronto in December 2023.
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